This Future Robot Made By CalTech Can Fly

Spread the love


Last Updated: August 25, 2022, 11:52 IST

According to CalTech, LEONARDO is the first robot that uses multi-joint legs and propeller-based thrusters to get better control over its balance.

According to CalTech, LEONARDO is the first robot that uses multi-joint legs and propeller-based thrusters to get better control over its balance.

Caltech’s Center for Autonomous Systems and Technologies (CAST) team has developed a new robot called LEONARDO which stands for “LEgs ONboARD drOne”.

We have all heard about smart drones and robots that climb up mountains but the future of robotics combines drones that come with legs. Basically, robots that can fly or drones that come with legs. Caltech’s Center for Autonomous Systems and Technologies (CAST) team has developed a new robot called LEONARDO which stands for “LEgs ONboARD drOne”. This robot can walk a slackline, hop, and even ride a skateboard. According to CalTech, LEONARDO is the first robot that uses multi-joint legs and propeller-based thrusters to get better control over its balance.

WATCH VIDEO: This Robot From The Future Can Fly

“By using a hybrid movement that is somewhere between walking and flying, the researchers get the best of both worlds in terms of locomotion. LEO’s lightweight legs take stress off of its thrusters by supporting the bulk of the weight, but because the thrusters are controlled synchronously with leg joints, LEO has uncanny balance,” according to CalTech.

WATCH VIDEO: Stop Making This Common Mistake With Your Videos

The LEONARDO robot is 2.5-feet tall and comes with two legs that have three actuated joints, along with four propeller thrusters mounted at an angle at the robot’s shoulders. “When a person walks, they adjust the position and orientation of their legs to cause their centre of mass to move forward while the body’s balance is maintained,” it explained.

WATCH VIDEO: Scary Sounds Of A Black Hole Recorded By NASA

“Because of its propellers, you can poke or prod LEO with a lot of force without actually knocking the robot over,” said Elena-Sorina Lupu (MS ’21), graduate student at Caltech and co-author of the Science Robotics paper.

Read all the Latest Tech News and Breaking News here



Source link

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*